If you keep reading…

You can expect to find my personal reflections on Black queerness and spirituality as it shows up in literature and in real life. Most of these posts will be based on interviews I’ve held with other Black queers about their experience of spirituality/religion. Some of my earlier posts detail how God/faith/spirituality/divinity are used by Black fiction writers in relation to queerness, gender queerness and femininity. This is part of a larger independent study that I am doing for my graduate master’s in social work. I’m passionate about the ways that divinity and queerness collide because queerness is often left out of explorations and manifestations of divinity and because representation is life-giving. This blog will focus on Blackness because I am Black and because Black queerness and Black spirituality have rich and complicated race specific legacies. If you have any questions about a term I use in a post, please comment and I will do my best to explain.

Jelani’s Magic Metal Detector

Jelani tells us their story as a Black West-Indian queer and gender queer person who grew up in a Southern Protestant Christian church. Three different baptisms (Catholic, Methodist, and Protestant), Easter hunts, children’s church, and an elder/deacon dad solidified for Jelani that religion was a core part of their family tradition. This tradition created a… Continue reading Jelani’s Magic Metal Detector

You are the prayer – Nayyirah Waheed

“as you are.’ says the universe. ‘after…’ you answer. ‘as you are.’ says the universe. ‘before…’ you answer. ‘as you are.’ says the universe. ‘when…’ you answer. ‘as you are.’ says the universe. ‘how…’ you answer. ‘as you are.’ says the universe. ‘why…’ you answer. ‘because you are happening now. right now. right at this… Continue reading You are the prayer – Nayyirah Waheed

Divinity is Dark-Skinned: Wild Seed by Octavia Butler

Divinity is Dark-Skinned: Wild Seed by Octavia Butler Even before reading Wild Seed, the first Octavia Butler story I’ve read, I had heard that she writes dystopian fiction on a whole other level. While reading it, I experienced Butler’s dystopia as intentionally written for the Black reader. This intentionality, paired with the revolutionary way her… Continue reading Divinity is Dark-Skinned: Wild Seed by Octavia Butler